Program

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08.45 - 09.45 – Eugenio Guglielmelli – IAS-13 Plenary Talk (Chair: Enrico Pagello)
Rehabilitation Robotics
Application of robots to rehabilitation has been proposed in the ‘80s, and it came to reality some ten years later. It is expected to be the next major medical domain, after diagnosis and surgery, to which robotics technology will be massively deployed in the short-medium term. The lecture will review basic design principles for rehabilitation robotic systems, which greatly benefit from a typical biomechatronic design approach. Main achievements in the field will be critically analyzed, and a few research case-studies, such as the wearable EVRYON system (www.evryon.eu) and the biocooperative MAAT system, will be discussed in more detail so to outline the open challenges for next generation rehabilitation robotic solutions.

9:45 - 10:00 – Introduction

10:00 - 10:25 - Hiroko Kamide
Human-like robots in Japanese culture
Recently human-like robots have been developed and mental safety for such robots for ordinary users are gathering more attention, especially from a cultural perspective. Japanese has a robot’s culture such as MANGA and animation but apart from the popularity of robots in Japan, some Japanese citizens are concerned about the negative social influences of robots (Bartneck et al., 2005). We investigated what views Japanese use to attribute emotions, intentions, and motivation to non-human agents and how Japanese culture has effects on anthropomorphism compared to American.
10:25 - 10:30 – discussion

10:30 - 10:55 - Francesco Ferrari and Maria Paola Paladino
Validation of the psychological scale of general impressions of humanoids in an Italian sample
Social robots are designed to communicate and interact with people. Beliefs, attitudes, emotions are indeed an essential part of the evaluation of social robots. In the present research we provide the first factorial validation of the Psychological Scale for General Impressions of Humanoids (PSGIH) outside Japan. An Italian sample completed an Italian version of the scale. Responses were analyzed in an explorative factorial analysis of the principal components. Similarities and differences between the present work and the original study on PSGIH are discussed.
10:55 - 11:00 – discussion

11:00 - 11:30 - Coffee Break

11:30 - 11:55 - Serena Ivaldi
Social learning and engagement in human-humanoid interactions
In the talk I will present some experiments about social and physical interaction between naive human participants and the humanoid robot iCub. In a first set of experiments, we tried to improve the engagement of the human teacher towards the robot by varying the robot's proactivity. In a second set of experiments, we investigated the factors influencing effective human-humanoid interaction in cooperative problem solving tasks. In particular, we focused on the personality factors that can influence the engagement and acceptability during physical, social and functional tasks.  The experiments were supported by the EDHHI project (EDHHI/SMART, ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02).
11:55 - 12:00 – discussion

12:00 - 12:25 - Christian I. Penaloza, Yasushi Mae, Fabio DallaLibera, Alexis S. Camacho, Masaru Kojima and Tatsuo Arai
Towards social imitation for humanoid robots
Social imitation allows humans to achieve social acceptance by observing and imitating behaviors of other people in their environment. Inspired in social learning theory, in this paper we present our approach for achieving social imitation in humanoid robots. Unlike common imitation learning approaches based on a one-to-one learning scheme (human teacher and robot student), we challenge the problem of social imitation in a many-to-one learning scheme (group of humans to robot), where a robot observes a group of people and imitates their common behavior. Our approach consists of 1) using kinesthetic teaching to provide the robot with a set of self-embodiment representations in terms of body poses, 2) discovering the common behavioral pattern of a group of people engaged in a particular activity, and 3) matching the behavior discovered from the group with robot’s internal body pose representations. User study results show that the robot is able to imitate a group of people in situations such as (1) Japanese style greeting (bowing), 2) hand greeting and 3) celebration gestures. Most importantly, post-study surveys indicate that people perceive a robot with social imitation capabilities as more intelligent and consider it as part of the group - as opposed to robots without this skill.
12:25 - 12:30 – discussion

12:30 - 12:55 - Nicola Bellotto
Making sense of human motion: estimation, interpretation and evaluation of people trajectories for autonomous systems
Recent advances in autonomous systems research are bringing robots and smart environments closer and closer to our daily lives. In order to operate safely and provide reliable services, these systems must detect, identify and understand human behaviours. In this talk I will present past and ongoing research in the area of people tracking, with a special focus on Human-Robot Spatial Interaction (HRSI), discussing some of the tools and techniques used to estimate and interpret human motion trajectories. In particular, I will show some recent work on the application of a Qualitative Trajectory Calculus (QTC) to evaluate HRSIs, discussing also possible extensions to other domains. The presentation will conclude with an insight into current limitations and future research in this area.
12:55 - 13:00 – discussion

13:00 - 14:15 - Lunch Break

14:15 - 14:40 - Giacomo Sommavilla, Giulio Paci, Fabio Tesser, and Piero Cosi
Voice controlled child-robot interactions - development of ASR and TTS systems for the NAO robot within the ALIZ-E project
This paper describes the development of a voice controlled child-robot interaction system for the NAO robot platform within the ALIZ-E project. The ALIZ-E integrated system includes various components but we mainly concentrate on describing the Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and the Text To Speech (TTS) synthesis components and their performance.
14:40 - 14:45 – discussion

14:45 - 15:10 - Friederike Eyssel
What makes machines social? A psychological perspective
The talk emphasizes the importance of a theory-based, empirical approach to study the question as to what makes robots a social entity. To do so, we first introduce psychological theorizing on the denial of humanity to humans -  a line of research  that focuses on the human-human intergroup context. We will show that such previous work is informative for researchers in social robotics , in that it provides theory-based ideas and measures of typical human features that can be attributed to humans and nonhuman entities alike. We will then provide an overview of the 3-Factor-Model of Anthropomorphism - a recent theoretical framework by Epley, Waytz and Cacioppo (2007) that proposes three key determinants which drive anthropomorphic inferences. Most importantly, will then summarize the latest experimental evidence on determinants of psychological anthropomorphism of social robots. Specifically, our findings clearly provide empirical answers to the research questions as to why and when we humanize nonhuman entities and which features and functions of a respective robotic or virtual system contribute to its perception as more human-like. These findings will be discussed with regard to their relevance for basic and applied research both in psychology and robotics.
15:10 - 15:15 – discussion

15:15 - 15:40 - Jean-Daniel Dessimoz and Pierre-François Gauthey
Definitions and metrics for social robotics, along with some experience gained in this domain
Social robotics is currently a field of strong interest for at least two reasons: the emerging possibility to have robots helping humans; and the conjecture in evolutionary biology that humans have seen their cognitive capabilities and their unique brain properties develop out of social requirements. The paper discusses these contexts, shows the continuity through scale changes, namely at collective, nominal and subsystems levels, of cognitive concepts and processes. On this basis, what has been introduced for individual cognitive agents, including evaluating techniques, is mapped onto societies. Among other aspects, individual meditation and thinking are shown to become social deliberation and discussing. Examples with a robot group helping humans in domestic and restaurant applications are also developed and discussed.
15:40 - 15:45 – discussion

15:45 - Greetings

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Timetable

8:45 9:45 Eugenio Guglielmelli – IAS-13 Plenary Talk (Chair: Enrico Pagello)
Rehabilitation Robotics
9:45 10:00 Introduction
10:00 10:25 Hiroko Kamide
Human-like robots in Japanese culture
10:25 10:30 discussion
10:30 10:55 Francesco Ferrari and Maria Paola Paladino
Validation of the psychological scale of general impressions of humanoids in an Italian sample
10:55 11:00 discussion
11:00 11:30 Coffee Break
11:30 11:55 Serena Ivaldi
Social learning and engagement in human-humanoid interactions
11:55 12:00 discussion
12:00 12:25 Christian I. Penaloza, Yasushi Mae, Fabio DallaLibera, Alexis S. Camacho, Masaru Kojima and Tatsuo Arai
Towards social imitation for humanoid robots
12:25 12:30 discussion
12:30 12:55 Nicola Bellotto
Making sense of human motion: estimation, interpretation and evaluation of people trajectories for autonomous systems
12:55 13:00 discussion
13:00 14:15 Lunch Break
14:15 14:40 Giacomo Sommavilla, Giulio Paci, Fabio Tesser, and Piero Cosi
Voice controlled child-robot interactions - development of ASR and TTS systems for the NAO robot within the ALIZ-E project
14:40 14:45 discussion
14:45 15:10 Friederike Eyssel
What makes machines social? A psychological perspective
15:10 15:15 discussion
15:15 15:40 Jean-Daniel Dessimoz and Pierre-François Gauthey
Definitions and metrics for social robotics, along with some experience gained in this domain
15:40 15:45 discussion
15:45   Greetings